Tag Archives: Politics

Any Hope (for the British) Left? 8 Positives from the 2015 Election

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Increased support for a more representative electoral system is one of the reasons to be hopeful.

Increased support for a more representative electoral system is one of the reasons to be hopeful.

In the UK, us left-wingers were dealt a devastating blow last week with the election of a Conservative government for the next 5 years. The proverbial dust has settled, but is this little more than glitter on a turd? I hope not, and here are my reasons for being positive.

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10 Reasons Not to Vote UKIP

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Unfortunate juxtaposition.

In the UK’s upcoming 2015 general election, many people seem tempted to vote for Nigel Farage’s UK Independence Party (an anti-Europe, anti-immigration party), seeing it as a fresh change from the tired old politics of the main parties. Here are some rather quick, but no less damning thoughts as to why that’s a terrible idea. Read the rest of this entry

The Problem With Little White Girls (and Boys)

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Perfect, succinct article about why people, young or otherwise, from the minority or ‘first’ world going on these feel good trips to the majority world in the name of ‘charity’ is a bad thing. This is partly because it is much more cost effective and environmentally friendly to send the funds directly to give the jobs to skilled natives, but do click through to read the article for more.

Pippa Biddle

White people aren’t told that the color of their skin is a problem very often. We sail through police check points, don’t garner sideways glances in affluent neighborhoods, and are generally understood to be predispositioned for success based on a physical characteristic (the color of our skin) we have little control over beyond sunscreen and tanning oil.

After six years of working in and traveling through a number of different countries where white people are in the numerical minority, I’ve come to realize that there is one place being white is not only a hindrance, but negative –  most of the developing world.

Removing rocks from buckets of beans in Tanzania. Removing rocks from buckets of beans in Tanzania.

In high school, I travelled to Tanzania as part of a school trip. There were 14 white girls, 1 black girl who, to her frustration, was called white by almost everyone we met in Tanzania, and a few teachers/chaperones…

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Poppies For Peace?

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The elusive peace poppy - but does it do justice to the fight against militarism?

The elusive peace poppy – does it do justice to the fight against militarism?

In 2011 Prince William called the (red) poppy “the universal symbol of remembrance”, and from my experience of England it would be near-impossible to disagree with him. In late October / early November, in every kind of workplace it is expected for people to wear them, in public most people are wearing them, and on television they are evidently compulsory. It is not just this social conformity that we must be suspicious of, but that this potent symbolism has permeated our daily lives to the point of ubiquity. Read the rest of this entry

Against Employment

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“Nothing is work unless you’d rather be doing something else.”  (Usually attributed to George Halas, but I'll bet he got it from this Snorlax–Mr. Lazy hybrid.)

“Nothing is work unless you’d rather be doing something else.”
(Usually attributed to George Halas, but I’ll bet he got it from this Snorlax–Mr. Lazy hybrid.)

In a previous post I argued that Western culture needs to make a dramatic shift away from devoting so many hours towards paid employment. This has become something of a hot topic in the USA right now, partly because some implications of the Affordable Care Act apparently involve forcing some employees to reduce their hours (why such a rich country must interfere with all employers just to ensure that sick children born to poor parents aren’t simply left to die is beyond me and thankfully also besides the point here), but mainly because The Partially Examined Life covered the topic of work in their most recent podcast. In the following guest post, my friend Joey Jones -in a section from his Philosophy MA thesis- takes a rather different view on work both to myself in that aforementioned post, and to the traditional socialist position represented by Karl Marx, whose views I have also written on.

Introduction

Governments always want to increase the amount of work being performed via employment levels, but is this a goal we should be seeking? This depends on whether doing so is in peoples’ best interests. Read the rest of this entry

Feminism is the answer to a lot more problems than women’s rights

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From my friend Benjamin Thomas, today with some socialist sense rather than liberal rubbish. Click through to his site to read the whole article. // I support affirmative action. Societal issues of justice must be viewed on a historical basis rather than just in the present tense.

Liberal Rubbish

So many problems in the world are caused or exacerbated by the way we’ve programmed men (who are the ones running things, in the main) to make decisions. We tell them from when they are children that conflict is good, that winning is everything, that talking and reasoning out our differences are for girls, that co-operation is only for the weak, that negotiation is tantamount to surrender, and that strength is the ultimate form of power. As a result, we have complex international issues such as the Syrian crisis reduced to pathetic dick-waving, as countless commentators, politicians, and voters peddle the ridiculous idea that anything other than BOMB THE BASTARDS is tantamount to appeasement. The same problems can be seen in our marketplace, where co-operation, long-term thinking, and sustainable methods are run over by short-term, high-risk, competitiveness. Our democratic process is shambles, with complex issues and problems reduced to macho…

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