Monthly Archives: January 2012

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Unfortunately I’ve exhausted my quota of interestingness per article on this pic.

As I know even less about economics than I do law you’ll be happy to know this isn’t an opinion piece but a summary of the documentary series. With thanks to Robert Peston ©BBC, December 2011.

 The 2008 Crash will likely lead to the worst decline in the real standard of living since the Great Depression. There have been a variety of documentary treatments of the Crash ranging from Charles Ferguson’s award-winning Inside Job to Michael Moore’s lighthearted yet heartbreaking Capitalism: A Love Story. All such treatments are necessarily inadequate due to the complexity of the events (especially my personal favourite, Adam Curtis’  All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace – since that tried to cover the Crash in a couple of minutes!). While I would like to compare their perspectives for you, I really am far too ignorant of how money works to do so (both the books I’ve bought on the financial crisis appear resolute in their determination to remain unread). Perhaps Peston (the BBC News economics editor) will enlighten me? Read the rest of this entry

Robert Peston’s The Party’s Over: How the West Went Bust

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Glory of Colour - Sujanan

My post which was the most original (philosophically) so far was a discussion of the relationship between Eudaimonology and Soteriology. I posed a few questions about the former which will take a long time to answer (such is philosophy).

At the most general level my project is to defend eudaimonology as highly relevant and as the central concern of philosophy. Of course an important part of this project is refining an appropriate definition of the subject. While so far I have only made introductory posts about a third of the different traditions I’m aware of, I realised a working definition while reading the other night. If I remember correctly it looked something like this…

Eudaimonology is study of how human life is to be lived, focusing on:

1. What human beings are (the task of philosophical anthropology),

2. What makes human life fulfilling (a conceptual as well as psychological question),

3. How human beings should interact with one another (the task of ethics and socio-political philosophy),

4. How human nature can transcend itself to become something greater (a soteriological question).

Regarding the first of these, Vincent Nichols said recently that the understanding of human nature is an excellent basis upon which to carry out public discourse because it cuts away pernicious individualism. I agree. Though my expertise falls more towards the study of point 4 (and to a lesser extent points 3 and 2), we should begin from the common acceptance of the human species as the product of natural selection. After this, there are many different theories/traditions in the debate on human nature. I have yet not studied these but I have indicated my sympathy for Marx’s early writings.

Eudaimonology Project Update

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This is not a pro-life blog. I am not a pro-life campaigner. And I’m certainly not a lawyer (something you are no doubt as relieved about as myself). But after my previous posts touched on issues of applied ethics without going into them particularly comprehensively, I would just like to clarify some of the other reasons that I’m against euthanasia and abortion. Read the rest of this entry

More Thoughts On ‘Pro-Life’

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I've noticed that everybody that is for abortion has already been born.

Most people have double standards about some things such as sport, the arts or their job- this is unfortunate but such irrational behaviour is a inevitable part of human life. Yet when people exhibit double standards on issues of life and death this is a very serious matter, as we saw in Part 1.

{Unlike my previous foray into applied ethics this is a piece of journalism rather than an academic essay, so it is not intended to be comprehensive. I only hope that what I say is stimulating and perhaps challenging.}

Read the rest of this entry

Double Standards On Life and Death, Part 2

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Life and DeathMost people have double standards about some things such as sport, the arts or their job- this is unfortunate but such irrational behaviour is a inevitable part of human life. Yet when people exhibit double standards on issues of life and death this is a very serious matter.

{Unlike my previous foray into applied ethics this is a piece of journalism rather than an academic essay, so it is not intended to be comprehensive. I only hope that what I say is stimulating and perhaps challenging.} Read the rest of this entry

Double Standards On Life and Death, Part 1